A big appeal for a tiny bird

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One of Australia’s smallest – and shyest – native birds needs your help to survive.
 
The Mt Lofty Ranges Southern Emu-wren was named for its spectacular tail feathers, which can grow to up to 12cm in length. With a tiny body just 6cm long, it is one of Australia’s smallest birds.
 
The wren typically inhabits swamps and heathlands. However, as these areas have been drained and cleared for agricultural development, the birds have suffered devastating habitat fragmentation, and populations have fallen perilously low.
 
With as few as 250 individuals remaining, the Mt Lofty Ranges Southern Emu-wren is now classified as Critically Endangered and found only on South Australia’s Fleurieu Peninsula.
 
Nature Foundation SA acquired Watchalunga Nature Reserve in 2015 with this specific conservation focus. The 92 hectare reserve is made up of low lying Fleurieu Peninsula swamp and mixed samphire sedgeland at the mouth of the Finniss River, creating a vital haven for birdlife.
 
We believe that no species lives in isolation; all flora and fauna interacts to create sustainable ecosystems. We take a holistic approach to biodiversity outcomes at Watchalunga Nature Reserve and the five other properties we manage, including fostering increased plant and animal species diversity.
 
With your donation, we will increase biodiversity at Watchalunga through revegetation, with a plan to plant in excess of 4,000 native flora tubestock in winter and spring next year. Improving landscape connectivity in this way will help us increase the population viability of the Mt Lofty Ranges Southern Emu-wren.
 
We will use your donation to implement research to better understand the genetic make-up of the wren, habitat cues and wren chick survival rates, filling knowledge gaps and working with the local community to see this population thrive again.
 
With your support, we will strive to secure viable populations of this Critically Endangered little bird to give it the best possible chance of survival. Help us to help nature by donating now!